5. X-Men: Apocalypse

In a vacuum, this film was amazing. Apocalypse was menacing. The younger iterations of Storm, Jean Grey, Nightcrawler, and Cyclops were fantastic. Quicksilver's spotlight moment was even more monumental than “Days of Future Past.” There is so much good about this movie, but it falters for a reason that isn't even bad, just overdone. It feels weird to complain about the focus on Magneto, Professor X and Mystique when all three actors turn in very strong performances, but in the sixth film thrusting them to the center, audiences need a break, especially when there is so much other talent to be harvested. Even with the flawed focus, Bryan Singer turns in another strong installment with great action, well-timed humor and a masterful handling on

4. Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice (Extended Edition)

Zack Snyder should never be allowed to edit the theatrical cuts of his films. He can't do it effectively enough without dropping plot and character details. A few details, a couple of extra lines explain so much and negate some of the biggest criticisms of the film.

Mixing Golden Age characterization with Frank Miller's Dark Knight may not have been to everyone's taste—Tyler Hoechlin's Clark Kent is probably more to your liking—but those who claimed that Snyder didn't understand comics shows how many fans view matters though their own prisms and don't seek to educate themselves before casting judgment. Ben Affleck perfectly embodied both Bruce Wayne and Batman. Gal Gadot may not fully embody Amazon, but she certainly carried herself royally. Doomsday actively evolving with each attack is a twist that wonderfully takes advantage of the benefits of changing mediums from page to screen.

3. Doctor Strange

he Marvel Cinematic Universe has covered superheroes, mythology, science fiction, and now, magic. This film laid a lot of track for a whole new aspect of storytelling, setting up multiple plot points for future projects. That was all in addition to introducing a new protagonist. All were accomplished admirably and accompanied by stunning visuals truly giving the production an otherworldly feel.


Even more than adding in the mystical side of Marvel, the film served to expand the scope of what an MCU film can entail, providing just enough of the signature elements while establishing a distinctly individual voice.

2. Captain America: Civil War

This was undeniably a Captain America movie, but each of the twelve costumed heroes was given their time to shine, necessary story time, and was changed by the proceedings. While many a franchise has faltered when a single hero has to contend with multiple villains, the Russo brothers' extensive television experience pays off big here, as they handle the large cast seamlessly.


Every actor, whether established or fresh faces turns in a solid performance and lands the necessary emotional beats. From developing the core conflict to telling Black Panther's origin to introducing the new Spider-Man, the movie juggles a lot of balls at all times, yet creates a smooth unfolding of events that continually push the story forward while despite the amount of ground that needs to be covered.

1. Deadpool

Setting aside direct adaptations like “Sin City” and “300” brought the comics to life panel-for-panel, this was the most faithful adaptation of a comic character to screen in the modern era. Ryan Reynolds was born to play this role, and Tim Miller, Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick did a tremendous job of translating the comic's attitude, unique style and humor.


Most adapted movies have to be talked about in degrees, weighed with the good and the bad, but when a movie gets it this right the breakdown becomes remarkably simple. If you love the comics, you loved the movie. If you hate the comics, you hated the movie. If you love the movie and have never read the comic, you should pick up some trades of the Joe Kelly/Ed McGuinness run...and maybe a plush unicorn.